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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/17/19 in all areas

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    Jonathan J. O'Neill collected tips for the new players. Please, read it! And if anyone else has other tips, feel free to add them. Money Management When booking a trip, book only one day. If you want to fish another day, press T to extend your trip to the next day. You will be prompted to pay for the extension there. If you book multiple days at once and you end the trip early, you won't get a refund. Read over your licenses. Know what you can keep and what you must keep/release. Fines for keeping or releasing restricted fish are severe. Do not rush to the shop as soon as you level up and buy that newest piece of equipment. Many times, you unlock something before you can effectively use it, such as higher test line. One of the first things you should think of purchasing when you level up is a better keepnet or stringer. They may have a relatively high upfront cost but a larger one allows you to keep more and larger fish, which translates to more money per day. Equipment and Gear There are four types of rods and two types of reels. Spinning, Match and Telescopic rods require a Spinning reel. A Casting rod requires a Casting reel. To float fish, you must use a Match rod or Telescopic rod. When assembling your rod, make sure each piece matches. Your rod should be the strongest part. The reel's max drag should be as close to the rod's max line weight without going over it. The line's test rating should be as close to the reel's max drag without going over. The line should be the weakest point of your setup. A broken line leads to a lost hook and lure/bait. It's much cheaper to replace these than it is to replace a reel or rod. Take the time to understand what each drag setting does for your reel. If you have a reel with a max drag of twelve pounds with six settings, that means that each drag setting adds two pounds of pressure to the line. A high drag reel with low test line can cause line breaks as soon as pressure is applied. Reels have two capacity measurements. Mono Capacity is the amount of monofilament or fluorocarbon line the reel can hold. Braid Capacity is the amount of braided line the reel can hold. For metric users, you would see a measuremnt such as Mono .12/65. This means the reel can hold sixty five meters of .12 millimeter monofilament or fluorocarbon line. For Imperial users, you would see a measurement such as Mono 2/80. This means the reel can hold eighty meters of two pound test monofilament or fluorocarbon line. Thanks to user [Sin] Striker for pointing out that it did not use "Feet" as I originally stated. The developers have opted to use "Meters" for capacity, rather than the industry standard "Yards". Thanks to user Deconstructed for helping me point that out. There are three types of line; Monofilament, Fluorocarbon and Braided. (Note: Some of this info may not translate in game yet) Monofilament line is your cheapest line. It has more stretch than fluoro and braid, which translates to a more forgiving hookset but makes it more difficult to detect subtle bites or hits against structures. It also has near neutral bouyancy which means it will sink slowly. Finally, Mono is more visible than fluoro but less visible than braid, which can affect a fishes tendency to bite. Fluorocarbon line is your moderately priced line. It is the least visible line available and has a higher abrasion resistance than mono line which can help with snags. It is more sensitive to light bites and sinks faster than mono line. Fluro line also has a higher tensile strength than mono of the same diameter. Braided line, also called Superline, is your most expensive choice. The tensile strength of braided line is much higher than mono or fluoro lines of the same diameter, allowing you to power through snags or more easily land larger fish than if you used the other two types. The smaller diameter allows you to load more of it on a reel than you could with the other two types of line. Finally, it is the most visible line, which may make fish less likely to bite and due to it's positive bouyancy, it also floats. Hooks range in size from smallest to largest; 10, 8, 6, 4, 2, 1, 1/0, 2/0, 3/0, 4/0, 5/0, 6/0, 7/0, 8/0, 9/0, and 10/0. There are two types of fish keepers. Keep Nets allow you to release a fish you've caught. These generally have a lower overall and single fish weight than stringers at the same tier. Stringers generally allow you to keep more and larger fish than keepnets at the same tier, but you cannot release fish placed on them. The Retrieve To perform a Lift and Drop retrieve, press the left and right mouse buttons at the same time for the same duration. Approximately one second. To perform a Stop and Go retrieve, reel in approximately three to five meters of line, stop for a couple of seconds and repeat the process. To perform a Twitch retrieve, reel in continuously while tapping the right mouse button to cause small jerks in the line. Straight retrieves are just that. A retrieve where you steadily reel in without performing any other actions. There are two variants, a slow one and a normal one. Take note that a lure's weight will affect the speed required to do a proper retrieve. Heavier lures will require a faster retrieve as do lures that are further away. To adjust your speed, use scrollwheel up or down to select between four different speeds and reverse. Hooking and Fighting Fish When using float rigs, match the bait to the float. Each type of float is designed for a specific weight of bait. If the bait is too heavy for the float, it will sink. When setting the hook, try to pull the rod in the opposite direction as the fish is traveling. Pulling in the same direction can pull the hook out of it's mouth before being properly set. When fighting a fish, and tension starts to increase, press and hold right mouse or the return key to pull back on the rod. Pulling back causes a fish to tire out. Turn away from the fish in the opposite direction of it's travel while holding right mouse. This puts a little extra distance between the rod tip and the fish for the next tip. When tension begins to fall as the fish tires, release right mouse or the return key and start to reel in with left mouse or the space bar while slowly turning towards the fish. That allows for a little extra slack in the line to be reeled in each time you pump the fish. Never reel in while holding right mouse or the return key, especially when tension is still high. This will only cause line to leave your reel more quickly. If a fish is too much for you to handle and you want to end the fight, press B to cut the line or reverse your reel to pay out line. Continue paying out line until the fish spits the hook due to low line tension. Imperial/Metric Conversions There are two choices for units of measurement in game. The following are some brief conversions to aid you if someone uses a measurement you're not familiar with. 1 Inch = 2.5 Centimeters (Predominantly used with leader depth) 3.3 Feet = 1 Meter (Predominantly used with line length and cast distance) 1 Ounce = 28.3 Grams (Predominantly used with lure weight) 2.2 Pounds = 1 Kilogram (Predominantly used with fish weight, line test and reel drag) Another difference with Imperial and Metric is time. The Metric setting uses a twenty-four hour clock. The Imperial setting uses a twelve hour clock. 12:00AM = 00:00 12:00PM = 12:00 1:00AM = 01:00 1:00PM = 13:00 2:00AM = 02:00 2:00PM = 14:00 3:00AM = 03:00 3:00PM = 15:00 4:00AM = 04:00 4:00PM = 16:00 5:00AM = 05:00 5:00PM = 17:00 6:00AM = 06:00 6:00PM = 18:00 7:00AM = 07:00 7:00PM = 19:00 8:00AM = 08:00 8:00PM = 20:00 9:00AM = 09:00 9:00PM = 21:00 10:00AM = 10:00 10:00PM = 22:00 11:00AM = 11:00 11:00PM = 23:00
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